Report from the GTK hackfest in Brussels

Thanks to the GNOME Foundation, various GTK developers were able to meet in Brussels right after FOSDEM, for one of our yearly hackfests.

The main topics of the hackfest were:

  • recap the work that landed into the master branch in the past 6-12 months, in order to have everyone on the same page
  • discuss the features still in flight in separate branches, assess their state of completion, and identify blockers
  • figure out what are the blockers for the first release of GTK 4.0

Hackfests allow us to have this kind of discussions with a large bandwidth at our disposal, compared to online communication channels, so they are very important for the project.

You can see the full agenda on the wiki, and we’ll make sure to write articles on the biggest items on it.

The largest items of the discussion were the introduction of new list models and list/grid view widgets; a unified key handling API; the decoupling of layout management policies from containers, and the introduction of constraint layout management; the possibility of merging widgets from libhandy, to allow for writing applications responsive to form factor changes; the switch to a purely declarative menu description API, and the removal of public menu widgets; adding 2D and 3D transformations to GtkWidget; implementing an animation API that applications can consume.

  • list models and list/grid widgets — we’d really like to retire GtkTreeView and GtkIconView, but the existing replacements, GtkListBox and GtkFlowBox, are not performant enough when scaling to very large and dynamic data sets. We need better data storage types, that can be composed to perform operations such as mapping, filtering, and sorting, but can also avoid iterating over all the elements when sizing and drawing widgets. Benjamin Otte already added various models to GTK, and is working on a list and a grid view widgets that can efficiently display their contents. Benjamin and other GNOME application developers are in the process of identifying various stakeholders for  a separate hackfest specifically for gathering more requirements and getting feedback on the new API.
  • unified key handling API — now that we moved all our pointer and touch input handling away from events and towards gestures, we want to do the same for key handling, like key bindings, mnemonics, and accelerators. The overall design is based on triggering actions, and allow introspection of all the “shortcuts” currently available to the GTK inspector, for ease of debugging. There is a development branch already available.
  • layout managers — in GTK 3, layout is imposed by containers on their children; we want to be able to decouple that from widgets and move it into a separate delegate objects hierarchy. Layout managers allow us to reduce the complexity of writing new widgets; they keep the layout code in a separate, non-derivable type; and they allow us to simplify the toolkit internals to the point that we might even make GtkWidget and instantiable type in the future. Layout managers are the first step towards adding constraint-based layout management to GTK, which do away with nesting boxes to create complex UIs. There is a development branch already available. For more information on constraint layouts, you can see the Emeus experimental library for GTK 3.
  • merging widgets from libhandy — Adrien Plazas gave an overview of what’s currently provided by libhandy, and what would be useful to have straight from GTK4 in the future. We discussed reactive layouts, and the ability express sizing with percentages, as well as possibly using constraints to get similar results.
  • declarative menus — GTK has iterated over different menus API over the years; from building menus out of widgets, to GtkUIManager, to GtkBuilder, to GMenu; we also moved to declaring the behaviour of pop up menus, in order to have the windowing system display them more accurately without exposing global coordinates. There’s a lot of overlap, but no clear winner, mostly because we still allow using widgets to build application menus and context menus. Fully switching to declarative style menus, adding new API to make them more expressive, and making GtkMenu and friends private implementations for the toolkit, would allow us to get things like being able to inspect all menus, even out of process; menus manipulable by plugin systems without necessarily creating widgets and keeping track of them; avoiding positioning bugs. There is a full strawman proposal available on the wiki, and Matthias Clasen is working on switching context menus to GMenu in a development branch.
  • widget transformations — Sadly, Timm Bädert couldn’t make it to the hackfest, but we’ve been reviewing his development branch that adds 2D and 3D transformations to GTK widgets, and we’re very excited about it.
  • animations — one last thing we’d like to land for GTK4 is an animation framework for GTK widgets to replace the current generic “frame tick callback”. The model for it is the Clutter explicit animation API, which in turn was based on Core Animation and CSS3 transitions. This work is still in the design phase, but you can expect development branches for it to land soon.

Aside from the big topics, we also discussed various smaller ones:

  • improving performance and memory use; we want to expose the SysProf counters during the frame clock phases, so we can easily identify problems.
  • improving the test suite, especially when it comes to reporting failures; right now, we have to go through the CI failure log, but we’d like to publish proper reports using the GitLab CI infrastructure
  • replacing child properties with real GObject properties on ancillary objects, especially for layout managers; would make documentation, introspection, and usage clearer.
  • finishing the drag and drop rework, to get a more modern API.
  • adding a top-level interface for “window-like” objects—such as windows, dialogs, popovers, menus/popups—useful for establishing common behaviour, and removing hacks and complexity in GtkWindow.

And, finally, yes: we did remove the “plus” from GTK. ;-)

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